Mark Klein

I am a Principal Research Scientist at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, where I have worked for nearly 20 years. My background includes a PhD in Artificial Intelligence from the University of Illinois, as well as research and teaching positions at Hitachi, Boeing, Pennsylvania State University, the University of Zurich and the Nagoya Institute of Technology.news

I do research at the intersection of artificial intelligence and social computing, studying how computers can enable better knowledge sharing and decision making among groups of humans.

I have 180 publications (with 8000 citations, an h-index of 43, and over 11,000 downloads) and have won US$7 million dollars in research funding. My approach is multi-disciplinary, and I am deeply committed to having a direct impact on solving real-world problems, especially in the sustainability and deliberative democracy realms.

I serve on the editorial boards and program committees for many of the most respected journals and conferences on artificial and collective intelligence. I also serve on the advisory boards for several social computing startups, and am pursuing the commercialization of my own research.

I’ve taught full-semester university courses on social computing and given scores of tutorials and other invited presentations throughout North and South America, Europe, and the Pacific Rim.

I have a long-standing commitment to engagement with the international research community. I’ve hosted many international visitors in my lab at MIT, and have done extended research visits throughout North and South America, Europe, and the Pacific Rim. I’ve taught graduate-level classes in Japanese, and had interesting conversations in French and Spanish.

Contact Information

Prof. Mark Klein
77 Massachusetts Avenue, E94-1505
Cambridge MA 02139 USA

m_klein@mit.edu
617-253-6796

Mark Klein

News & Updates

June 2017. New paper! Towards Crowd-Scale Deliberation discusses how crowds can produce more (pareto-) optimal outcomes than current collective decision-making approaches.

June 2017. I participated in the advisory board meeting for empowr, a startup that is developing an online marketplace/democracy to help address poverty issues throughout the world.

More News
April 2017. A new article that highlights the Deliberatorium has appeared in The Walrus, a respected Canadian online magazine.

March 2017. I was a keynote speaker at the NIT International Symposium on Future Informatics, talking about how crowd computing systems can approach pareto-optimal collective decisions.

March 2017. I spent March and April in Japan as a visiting professor at Takayuki Ito‘s lab in the Nagoya Institute of Technology, teaching and doing research on social computing.

January 2017. New paper! Supporting Argumentation in Online Political Debate, to appear in New Media and Society Journal.

December 2016. Our team won a grant from the Templeton Foundation for the Scholio project, whose goal is to develop technologies that enable greater “intellectual humility” in public discourse.

August 2016. I was a visiting research fellow at the Social Media Lab at Ryerson University, working on deliberation-centric social media analysis.

January 2016. I was featured in an article on collective intelligence in El Pais, Spain’s pre-eminent national newspaper, as well as an interview(starting around minute 40) on the Spanish radio program Siglo 21.

December 2015. I was a visiting research fellow at the University of Alcala in Alcala Spain, working on protocols for enabling complex negotiation. I also was a keynote speaker at the Prado Medialab in Madrid Spain, talking about tools for deliberative democracy.

November 2015. I was a visiting international professor at the Nagoya Institute of Technology, where I taught a course on collective intelligence.

October 2015. New paper! High-Speed Idea Filtering with the Bag of Lemons in Decision Support Systems Journal.

Research

Mission

My research mission to develop technology that helps large crowds of human and software agents work together to solve our most critical and difficult real-world challenges.

Approach

My approach is multi-disciplinary, drawing from artificial intelligence, social computing, data science, operations research, complex systems science, economics, management science, human-computer interaction, amongst others.

Projects

I am developing new concepts for how computing technology can empower the different stages of the collective intelligence lifecycle:
Collective Sensemaking

Crowdmining

One of the biggest challenges facing 21st century institutions is figuring out how to mine useful insights from the vast data sets now available to us. Current data mining technologies allow us to generate compressed views of large data sets, but lack people’s ability to figure out what they mean and thereby create actionable intelligence. My goal is to achieve this by engaging crowds in scouring big data for insights, creating, building upon and critiquing each other’s hypotheses about what the data has to say. This capability can then be used for applications ranging from business and government data analytics to intelligence analysis.

Deliberative Predictive Markets

Prediction markets represent a promising technique for assessing the likelihood of future scenarios, but are limited by the fact that crowd members do not share the reasons and evidence underlying their judgments, so participants can often make poorly-informed assessments. The goal of this project is to develop a deliberative prediction market framework wherein crowd members, supported by data-intensive analytics, share and evaluate the rationale for their assessments, in addition to just entering scenario probability estimates.

Collective Innovation

The Deliberatorium

Challenge
Current social media fail badly when we try to engage large crowds in deliberating about how to solve complex problems, typically generating huge volumes of highly redundant disorganized content of very mixed quality, making it prohibitively expensive to find the “good stuff”, as well as difficult to measure and improve how well the crowd meets the customer’s needs. This problem plagues a broad swath of institutions, including news media, business, government, and NGOs.

Approach
The Deliberatorium is a web-based system that combines ideas from argumentation theory and social computing to address this critical challenge. Under development since 2007, it has been used by thousands of individuals in such institutions as Intel, the Federal Bureau of Land Management, and the Italian Democratic Party.

Videos
Introduction to MIT Deliberatorium (10″)
Introduction to the Deliberatorium (20″ research talk at the 2012 Yale Epistemic Democracy Workshop)

Selected Publications

Spada, P., Iandoli, L., Quinto, I., Calabretta, R., & Klein, M. (2017). Argumentation vs Ideation in online political debate: evidence from an experiment of collective deliberation. New Media & Society.
Klein, M., & Convertino, G. (2014). An Embarrassment of Riches: A Critical Review of Open Innovation Systems. Communications of the ACM, 57(11):40-42.
Mark Klein, Paolo Spada, Raffaele Calabretta (2012). Enabling Deliberations in a Political Party Using Large-Scale Argumentation: A Preliminary Report. 10th International Conference on the Design of Cooperative Systems.
Bernstein, A., M. Klein and T. Malone (2012). Programming the Global Brain. Communications of the ACM, 55(5).
Gurkan, A., L. Iandoli, M. Klein and G. Zollo (2010). Mediating debate through on-line large-scale argumentation: evidence from the field. Information Sciences, 180:3686-3702.
Klein, M. and L. Iandoli (2008). Supporting Collaborative Deliberation Using a Large-Scale Argumentation System: The MIT Collaboratorium. Directions and Implications of Advanced Computing; Conference on Online Deliberation. University of California, Berkeley.

Popular Press
How Science Can Help Us Disagree, Sloan Management Review, Nature, New York Times, MIT Technology Insider (page 11), Information Week, MIT Tech Talk, The Independent (UK), Human Technology Journal, Next Generation Democracy (Chapter 4), Business Innovation in the Cloud (Chapter 9), finalist for 2011 Management Innovation Challenge

Funders
Intel, National Science Foundation, European Union FP7 program, John Templeton Foundation

Collaborators
Nicholas Adams, Jared Bataillon, Abraham Bernstein, Nancy Bordier, Marco Cioffi, Jeffrey Conklin, Gregorio Convertino, Anna de Liddo, Cristina Garcia, Ralf Groetker, Anatoliy Gruzd, Ali Gurkan, Luca Iandoli, Catholijn Jonker, James Lannigan, Chencan Xu & Yawen Li, Yiftach Nagar, Corey Nunez, Ivana Quinto, Hajo Reijers, Carlo Savoretti, Paolo Spada, Simon Buckingham Shum, Alex Smallwood, Catherine Spence, Mark Tovey, Cyril Velikanov, Michael Winikoff

Deliberation Analytics

Challenge
How can we monitor and guide open crowds, when they are deliberating in peer-to-peer contexts, so that their aggregate efforts progress efficiently towards good, well-evaluated solutions?

Approach
We are developing powerful analytics that datamine the digital traces of crowdsourced deliberation engagements to assess how well the deliberation is going, understand the skills and styles of the crowd members, and guide the crowd’s attention to better achieve the goals of the deliberation customer. This project builds upon a semi-automated, crowdsourced approach to tagging the deliberative content of social media interactions, and is using the resulting coding to derive powerful new types of social network analysis (e.g. to assess the degree of balkanization, or bias, in a community).

Videos
Deliberation Metrics

Selected Publications

Klein, M. (2012) Enabling Large-Scale Deliberation Using Attention-Mediation Metrics. Computer-Supported Collaborative Work, 21(4-5):449-473.
Klein, Gruzd & Lannigan (2017). Using Deliberation-Centric Social Network Analysis to Assess Interactive Signed Ties. Proceedings of Sunbelt. Beijing, China.
Klein, M. (2015). The Catalyst Deliberation Analytics Server. MIT Technical Report.

Funders
EU FP7 program

Collaborators
Anna de Liddo, Anatoliy Gruzd, Luca Iandoli, James Lannigan, Hajo Reijers, Simon Buckingham Shum

Artifact-Centric Knowledge Sharing

Challenge
How can we increase the efficiency and completeness of knowledge-sharing around highly complex technical artifacts such as airplanes and oil refineries? The sheer scale of the knowledge to share overwhelms conventional (keyword-based) search schemes, resulting in low retrieval precision and accuracy, and thus poor knowledge sharing, missed opportunities for improvement, and even unaddressed safety problems.

Approach
This project explores how the knowledge about a complex artifact can be indexed as semi-formal models attached to digital descriptions of the artifact itself. Documents with knowledge about a turbine blade can, for example, be hotlinked to the part of the CAD model that represents that blade. Or they can be hotlinked to elements in the process model which describes how the turbine works. This project has developed semi-formal rationale capture languages, intuitive user interfaces to enter the knowledge, and search tools to help people find relevant knowledge.

Selected Publications

Mark Klein, Abraham Bernstein (2004). Towards High-Precision Service Retrieval. Internet Computing Journal. 8(1):30-36.
Mark Klein (1997). Capturing Geometry Rationale for Collaborative Design. Sixth International Workshop on Enabling Technologies: Infrastructure for Collaborative Enterprises (WET ICE).
Mark Klein (1993). Capturing Design Rationale in Concurrent Engineering Teams. IEEE Computer. (26)1:39-47.

Funders
Siemens, British Petroleum, US Army Research Lab, Boeing

Collaborators
Prof. Abraham Bernstein

Pareto-Centric Collective Decision-making

This project is exploring how we can integrate advanced techniques for collective innovation, idea filtering, and complex negotiation to engage large crowds in finding Pareto-front solutions to complex and contentious problems. This direction promises high potential impact in such domains as participatory democracy and collaborative design. At a technical level, this work will require innovations across the collective problem-solving lifecycle, including crowdsourced moderation, crowd analytics, adaptive incentive mechanisms, idea filtering, complex negotiation, and algorithmic report generation.

Selected Publications

Klein, M. (2017). Towards Crowd-Scale Deliberation. Working Paper, MIT Center for Collective Intelligence.
Collective Decisionmaking

Complex Negotiation

Challenge
Current negotiation mechanisms fare well for the simple contexts they were designed for (e.g. a small number of parties, a small number of independent issues such as price) but are ill-suited to complex negotiations which include many parties, as well as many interdependent issues.

Approach
We are defining novel algorithms that help agents negotiate complex contracts with many interdependent issues, integrating ideas from nonlinear optimization as well as game theory. We have, further, been using machine learning techniques to determined which algorithms work best in which kinds of negotiation scenarios, by running simulated negotiations with thousands of systematically-generated negotiation scenarios.

Videos
An Introduction to Nonlinear Negotiation (9″)

Selected Publications

Hoz, E. D. L., Marsa-Maestre, I., Gimenez-Guzman, J. M., David Orden, Klein, M. (2017). Multi-agent nonlinear negotiation for Wi-Fi channel assignment. 16th International Conference on Autonomous Agents and Multiagent Systems
Aydogan, R., Marsa-Maestre, I., Klein, M., & Jonker, C. M. (2015). A Machine Learning Approach for Mechanism Selection in Complex Negotiations. Eighth International Workshop on Agent-based Complex Automated Negotiations (ACAN). Springer.
Marsa-Maestre, I., Klein, M., Jonker, C. M., Lopez-Carmona, M. A., & Aydogan, R. (2014). From Problems to Protocols: Towards a Negotiation Handbook. Decision Support Systems, 60:39-54.
Katsuhide Fujita, Takayuki Ito, Mark Klein (2014). Efficient Issue-Grouping Approach for Multiple Interdependent Issues Negotiation between Exaggerator Agents. Decision Support Systems. 60:10-17.
Zhang, S., Klein, M., & Marsa-Maestre, I. (2014). Scalable Complex Contract Negotiation With Structured Search and Agenda Management. Proceedings of the Twenty-Eighth AAAI Conference on Artificial Intelligence (AAAI-14).
Katsuhide Fujita, Takayuki Ito, Mark Klein (2012). A Secure and Fair Protocol that Addresses Weaknesses of the Nash Bargaining Solution in Nonlinear Negotiation. Group Decision and Negotiation Journal. 21(1):29-47
Hattori, H., M. Klein, and T. Ito (2007). Using Iterative Narrowing to Enable Multi-Party Negotiations with Multiple Interdependent Issues. Sixth International Joint Conference on Autonomous Agents and Multi-Agent Systems (AAMAS).
Ito, T., M. Klein, and H. Hattori (2007). Multi-issue Negotiation Protocol for Agents: Exploring Nonlinear Utility Spaces. Twentieth International Joint Conference on Artificial Intelligence (IJCAI).
Klein, M., P. Faratin, H. Sayama, and Y. Bar-Yam (2003). Protocols for Negotiating Complex Contracts. IEEE Intelligent Systems. 18(6):32-38.

Funders
National Science Foundation

Collaborators
Reyhan Aydogan, Yaneer Bar-Yam, Miguel Angel Lopez Carmona, Peyman Faratin, Katsuhide Fujita, Hiromitsu Hattori, Takayuki Ito, Catholijn Jonker, Ivan Marsa Maestre, Hiroki Sayama, Shelley Zhang

Idea Filtering with the Bag of Lemons

Challenge
Open innovation platforms (websites where crowds post ideas in a shared space) enable us to elicit huge volumes of potentially valuable solutions for problems we care about, but identifying the best ideas in these collections can be prohibitively expensive and time-consuming.

Approach
Our approach, called the “bag of lemons”, enables the crowd to filter ideas with accuracy superior to conventional (Likert scale) rating approaches, but in only a fraction of the time. The key insight behind this approach is that crowds are much better at eliminating bad ideas than at identifying good ones.

Selected Publications

Klein, M., & Garca, A-C-B. (2015). High-Speed Idea Filtering With the Bag of Lemons. Decision Support Systems 78(C):39-50.

Collaborators
Cris Garcia

Conflict Management in Collaborative Design

Challenge
Complex artifacts, ranging from physical artifacts like airplanes to virtual artifacts like software or process models, are created by many, sometimes thousands, of designers working on different but interdependent parts or concerns. If conflicts between these activities are detected late, or resolved imperfectly, this can have a huge negative impact on the timeliness, quality, and cost of the finished product. Existing conflict management approaches (e.g. change memos, multi-functional product review meetings, design-build teams) are however slow, expensive, and error-prone.

Approach
This project explores how AI technologies such as constraint management and diagnosis can greatly increase the speed and effectiveness of conflict detection and resolution in large-scale collaborative design settings.

Selected Publications

Mark Klein (1993) Supporting Conflict Management in Cooperative Design Teams. Group Decision and Negotiation (2):259-278.
Mark Klein (2000). Towards a Systematic Repository of Knowledge About Managing Collaborative Design Conflicts. International Conference on AI in Design.
Mark Klein (1991). Supporting Conflict Resolution in Cooperative Design Systems. IEEE Transactions on Systems, Man and Cybernetics 21(6).
Mark Klein (1989). Conflict Resolution in Cooperative Design. The International Journal For Artificial Intelligence in Engineering. 4(4):168-180.

Funders
National Science Foundation, Boeing

Pareto-Centric Collective Decision-making

This project is exploring how we can integrate advanced techniques for collective innovation, idea filtering, and complex negotiation to engage large crowds in finding Pareto-front solutions to complex and contentious problems. This direction promises high potential impact in such domains as participatory democracy and collaborative design. At a technical level, this work will require innovations across the collective problem-solving lifecycle, including crowdsourced moderation, crowd analytics, adaptive incentive mechanisms, idea filtering, complex negotiation, and algorithmic report generation.

Selected Publications

Klein, M. (2017). Towards Crowd-Scale Deliberation. Working Paper, MIT Center for Collective Intelligence.
Collective Action

Designing Robust Systems

Challenge
Complex systems are typically designed by describing the normative flow of events in an ideal world, and later augmenting it in an ad hoc way to include steps for handling (anticipating and avoiding, or detecting and resolving) any exceptions that may occur. This unsystematic process can be seriously deficient in terms of addressing all important possible exceptions, and in using best practices to deal with them. Such errors in process design have brought companies to bankruptcy (cf Barings Bank).

Approach
This project has been developing knowledge-based tools that help designers analyze normative process models, systematically enumerate possible exceptions, and suggest best practice techniques for handling these exceptions. The approach is based on a growing taxonomy base of widely-usable best-practice strategies for detecting, diagnosing and resolving exceptions.

Selected Publications

Klein, M. and C. Petti (2006). A Handbook-Based Methodology for Redesigning Business Processes. Knowledge and Process Management. 13(2):108-119.
Mark Klein and Chrysanthos Dellarocas (2000). A Knowledge-Based Approach to Handling Exceptions in Workflow Systems. Computer-Supported Collaborative Work. 9(3):399-412.

Funders
NSF, Defense Logistics Agency, Neptune Technologies, British Telecom, Hewlett-Packard, Boeing, University of Lecce (Italy)

Collaborators
Chrysanthos Dellarocas

Emergent Dysfunctions in Socio-Technical Systems

Challenge
Large-scale socio-technical systems, made up of many interacting human and/or machine components, now operate at unprecedented levels of scale, speed and interdependency, and thus can be prone to highly dysfunctional emergent dysfunctions (e.g. failure cascades, thrashing) that are new to our experience and thus difficult to anticipate and avoid, or detect and resolve.

Approach
This project has been cataloging the ways complex socio-technical systems (e.g. for resource sharing or collaborative decision making) can get mired in emergent dysfunctions, as well as developing novel techniques for avoiding or resolving such problems.

Selected Publications

Klein, M., H. Sayama, P. Faratin, and Y. Bar-Yam (2002). A Complex Systems Perspective on Computer-Supported Collaborative Design Technology. Communications of the ACM 45(11):27-31
Klein, M., R. Metzler, and Y. Bar-Yam (2005). Handling Emergent Resource Use Oscillations. IEEE Transactions on Systems Man and Cybernetics A 35(3):327-336
Mark Klein, Juan-Antonio Rodriguez-Aguilar and Chrysanthos Dellarocas (2003). Using Domain-Independent Exception Handling Services to Enable Robust Open Multi-Agent Systems: The Case of Agent Death. Autonomous Agents and Multi-Agent Systems. 7(1):179-189.

Funders
DARPA, NSF

Collaborators
Yaneer Bar-Yam, Chrysanthos Dellarocas, Juan Antonio Rodriguez-Aguilar, Hiroki Sayama

Contributions

I believe that my most significant research contributions to date include:

  • The Deliberatorium, a unique and powerful integration of the large-scale participation of social media with the systematic structure of argument theory. This project has elicited world-wide interest and is tracked for commercialization.
  • Complex Negotiation. While AI and computational economics researchers have devoted considerable resources to enabling simple negotiations (i.e. with one or a few independent issues such as price and delivery date), I have been a world leader in investigating how negotiation can work in more realistic settings where there are many diverse stakeholders and many interdependent issues.

Both projects have become the core of active global research efforts, powered by students and professors who have contributed their time and energy freely based on their belief in the project’s potential.

Teaching

Experience

I have prepared and taught highly-rated full-semester classes at universities in addition to scores of tutorials at businesses and conferences throughout the world. I have advised Masters and PhD students, post-docs and young faculty members at MIT and throughout the world.

Philosophy

My goal as a teacher is to help students find the simple in the complex, so they can have a clear and comprehensive understanding of the goals, techniques and open questions in a given field. I am told that I have a gift for this. I also work hard to engage students in an interactive process, rather than just lecture at them. I make extensive use of novel social computing tools of my own design, such as the Deliberatorium, to augment the learning experience. I also use peer-evaluated class projects to provide students with a simple but complete experience of the research life cycle. I’ve found that teaching and research are mutually supportive, so I often use my own research and real-world experience to enrich the class materials. As an advisor, I strive to help students find a path that elicits their passion and builds on their strengths. This has I believe helped them be more creative and productive and has led to many long-standing research collaborations.

Breadth

My diverse research portfolio has given me a deep background, suitable for teaching upper-level classes in artificial intelligence, social computing, multi-agent systems, knowledge management, and business process engineering. Perhaps my most unique contribution as a teacher is developing, over the last decade, a full semester class on social computing, a comprehensive, well-organized, multi-disciplinary overview of the goals, insights, challenges, techniques and possible future directions for this very important emerging field.

I am, in addition, an active developer with substantial experience with languages including Java, Javascript, Common Lisp, prolog, python, matlab and others, and with web-based and machine learning systems. This, along with my PhD in artificial intelligence, means that I would feel comfortable teaching a wide range of introductory computer and information systems courses including data structures and algorithms, web and other programming, databases, artificial intelligence, and so on.

Diversity

I view diversity as a source of joy and value and actively seek it out for myself and others. I’ve travelled extensively, and have taught, advised, and collaborated with students, researchers, faculty and others from North and South America, Europe, Asia, Africa, the Middle East, Australia and New Zealand. I speak four languages (English French Spanish and Japanese) and have taught graduate level classes in Japanese. Through these experiences, I have learned to be very mindful of differing cultural preferences e.g. in terms of being assertive in public, handling conflicts implicitly or openly, and so on, and have developed approaches for making the best of each context. In more restrained collectivist cultures like Japan, for example, I’ve used anonymous online in-class polls to foster classroom participation. In more unrestrained cultures such as Brazil’s, I often make use of small-group discussion formats such as the “World Cafe” to engender more discussion by parallelizing it. My wife is the organizer for the annual General Assembly for the Unitarian Universal Association (a liberal religious denomination) and through her I have learned much about understanding and respecting cultural sensitivities along religious, political, gender identity, sexual orientation, and racial lines. I look forward to whatever further opportunities I get to teach or collaborate with people with diverse cultures, skills, and perspectives.

Engagement

My aim is to achieve substantive real-world impact by designing, evaluating and refining my work with real-world customers, and then transitioning it into the marketplace. Engagement outside of the academic community has thus been a cornerstone of my work:

Understanding Needs

I have devoted many years, in collaboration with colleagues throughout the world, to better understanding humankinds’ sustainability needs and how social computing technology can help. I’ve concluded that we desperately need ways to substantively engage much wider swaths of our population in deciding what kind of society we want.

Evaluations

I have been very active in terms of evaluating my work with real-world problems and institutions, such as the Italian Democratic Party (electoral law reform), Intel(mobile device policy in fab plants), and the Federal Bureau of Land Management(water use in the southern US). I am currently pursuing opportunities with the US intelligence community, with news media and medical organizations, and with deliberative democracy NGOs.

Commercialization

I am pursuing commercialization of my work. A billionaire-funded socially-conscious VC firm in Australia has identified my Deliberatorium project as their #1 target for investment and is currently forming a team to commercialize it. We are also seeking partner investment in the US.

Advisory Boards

I serve on the advisory boards of startups in the online democracy space, where my work has been influential in terms of setting their strategic directions.

International Outreach

I have been very active in outreach to the international research community. I have taken visiting research positions in Spain, Canada, Brazil, Japan, New Zealand, Hong Kong, Italy and Switzerland, and have hosted scholars from Europe, Asia, Canada and South America in my lab at MIT.

Dissemination

I have given scores of tutorials and lectures at conferences, universities, businesses and other institutions such as NASA throughout the world.

Work

History

My work responsibilities have included conducting and disseminating ground-breaking research, acquiring funding to finance this work, supervising students, and leading international research collaborations, in addition to professional service (e.g. advisory boards for companies, editorial boards for journals, conference program committees), budget management, and so on.

Principal Research Scientist
Massachusetts Institute of Technology (Cambridge MA)
1997 to present
Research Faculty
Pennsylvania State University (University Park, PA)
1995 to 1997
Artificial Intelligence Specialist
Boeing Computer Services (Seattle, WA)
1991 to 1995
Research Scientist
Hitachi Advanced Research Lab (Tokyo, Japan)
1989 to 1991
Research Assistant
Cognitive Psychophysiology Lab, University of Illinois (Champaign, IL)
1981 to 1986

Educational

History

My education includes a deep grounding in the biological and cognitive foundations of human intelligence, in addition to a PhD in artificial intelligence from one of the world’s top-ranked computer-science departments.

PhD in Computer Science (Artificial Intelligence)
University of Illinois (Urbana Illinois)
Dissertation: Conflict Management in Collaborative Design
1989
MS in Computer Science
University of Illinois (Urbana, Illinois)
Thesis: A Computational Model of Emotion in Story-telling
1986
BA in Biochemistry
Dartmouth College (Hanover, New Hampshire)
1981

Publication

History

I have 180 publications with 7000 citations and an h-index of 42 (cf Google Scholar), in addition to 11,000 downloads (cf ResearchGate and SSRN). My papers have appeared in the world’s top-ranked journals and conferences in artificial intelligence and social computing, including Decision Support Systems, IEEE Computer, Communications of the ACM, JCSCW, Information Sciences, Systems Man and Cybernetics, IJCAI, AAAI, and CSCW.
Journal Publications
  1. Spada, P., Iandoli, L., Quinto, I., Calabretta, R., & Klein, M. (2017). Argumentation vs Ideation in online political debate: evidence from an experiment of collective deliberation. New Media & Society.
  2. Klein, M., & Garca, A-C-B. (2015). High-Speed Idea Filtering With the Bag of Lemons. Decision Support Systems, 78(C):39-50.
  3. Klein, M., & Convertino, G. (2015). A Roadmap for Open Innovation Systems. Journal of Social Media, 1(2).
  4. Klein, M., & Convertino, G. (2014). An Embarrassment of Riches: A Critical Review of Open Innovation Systems. Communications of the ACM, 57(11):40-42.
  5. Marsa-Maestre, I., Klein, M., Jonker, C. M., Lopez-Carmona, M. A., & Aydogan, R. (2014). From Problems to Protocols: Towards a Negotiation Handbook. Decision Support Systems, 60:39-54.
  6. Fujita, K., Ito, T., & Klein, M. (2014). An Approach to Scalable Multi-issue Negotiation: Decomposing the Contract Space. Computational Intelligence, 30(1):30-47.
  7. Fujita, K., Ito, T., & Klein, M. (2014). Efficient Issue-Grouping Approach for Multiple Interdependent Issues Negotiation between Exaggerator Agents. Decision Support Systems, 60:10-17.
  8. Klein, M. (2012) Enabling Large-Scale Deliberation Using Attention-Mediation Metrics. Computer-Supported Collaborative Work. 21(4):449-473
  9. Bernstein, A., M. Klein and T. Malone (2012). Programming the Global Brain. Communications of the ACM 55(5).
  10. Lopez-Carmona, M., Marsa-Maestre, I., Klein, M., & Ito, T. (2012). Addressing stability issues in mediated complex contract negotiations for constraint-based, non-monotonic utility spaces. Autonomous Agents and Multi-Agent Systems, 24(3):485-535.
  11. Fujita, K., Ito, T., & Klein, M. (2010). Representative based multi-round protocol based on revealed private information for multi-issue negotiations. Multiagent and Grid Systems, 6(5):459-476.
  12. Gurkan, A., L. Iandoli, M. Klein and G. Zollo (2010). Mediating debate through on-line large-scale argumentation: evidence from the field. Information Sciences 180:3686-3702.
  13. Katsuhide Fujita, Takayuki Ito, Mark Klein (2012). A Secure and Fair Protocol that Addresses Weaknesses of the Nash Bargaining Solution in Nonlinear Negotiation. Group Decision and Negotiation. 21(1):29-47
  14. Fujita, K., T. Ito and M. Klein (2009). Secure and Efficient Protocols for Multiple Interdependent Issues Negotiation. Journal of Intelligent and Fuzzy Systems 21(3):175-185.
  15. Parsons, S., J. A. Rodriguez-Aguilar and M. Klein (2011). Auctions and bidding: A guide for computer scientists. Communications of the ACM 43(2).
  16. Iandoli, L., G. Zollo, and M. Klein (2009). Enabling on-line deliberation and collective decision-making through large-scale argumentation: a new approach to the design of an Internet-based mass collaboration platform. International Journal of Decision Support System Technology. 1(1):69-91.
  17. Ito, T., M. Klein, and H. Hattori (2008). A Multi-Issue Negotiation Protocol among Agents with Nonlinear Utility Functions. Multiagent and Grid Systems. 4(1).
  18. Malone, T.W. and M. Klein (2007). Harnessing Collective Intelligence to Address Global Climate Change. Innovations Journal. 2(3):15-26.
  19. Margherita, A., M. Klein, and G. Elia (2007). Metrics-Based Process Redesign with the MIT Process Handbook. Knowledge and Process Management. 14(1):46-57.
  20. Hattori, H., T. Ito and M. Klein (2006). An Auction-based Negotiation Protocol for Agents with Nonlinear Utility Functions. Transactions of The Institute of Electronics, Information and Communication Engineers (IEICE) J89-D(12): 2648-2660.
  21. Klein, M. and C. Petti (2006). A Handbook-Based Methodology for Redesigning Business Processes Knowledge and Process Management Journal.13(2): 108-119.
  22. Klein, M., R. Metzler, and Y. Bar-Yam (2005). Handling Emergent Resource Use Oscillations. IEEE Transactions on Systems Man and Cybernetics (TSMC) A. March.
  23. Klein, M. and A. Bernstein (2004).Towards High-Precision Service Retrieval. IEEE Internet Computing Journal. 8(1):30-36.
  24. Klein, M., P. Faratin, H. Sayama, and Y. Bar-Yam (2003). Protocols for Negotiating Complex Contracts. IEEE Intelligent Systems. 18(6):32-38.
  25. Klein, M., P. Faratin, H. Sayama, and Y. Bar-Yam (2003). Negotiating Complex Contracts. Group Decision and Negotiation. 12(2).
  26. Klein, M., H. Sayama, P. Faratin, and Y. Bar-Yam (2003). The Dynamics of Collaborative Design: Insights From Complex Systems and Negotiation Research. Concurrent Engineering Research and Applications. 11(3).
  27. Klein, M., H. Sayama, P. Faratin, and Y. Bar-Yam (2002). A Complex Systems Perspective on Computer-Supported Collaborative Design Technology. Communications of the ACM. 45(11).
  28. Mark Klein, Juan-Antonio Rodriguez-Aguilar and Chrysanthos Dellarocas (2003). Using Domain-Independent Exception Handling Services to Enable Robust Open Multi-Agent Systems: The Case of Agent Death. Autonomous Agents and Multi-AgentSystems. 7(1).
  29. Mark Klein and Chrysanthos Dellarocas (2000). A Knowledge-Based Approach to Handling Exceptions in Workflow Systems. Computer-Supported Collaborative Work. Special Issue on Adaptive Workflow Systems. 9(3).
  30. Dellarocas, C., & Klein, M. (2000). A knowledge-based approach for handling exceptions in business processes. Information Technology and Management, 1(3) 155-169.
  31. A. Bernstein, C. Dellarocas and M. Klein (1999). Towards Adaptive Workflow Systems (CSCW-98 Workshop Report). SIGMODRecord, V28, No 3, September 1999.
  32. Thomas W. Malone, Kevin Crowston, Jintae Lee, Brian Pentland, Chrysanthos Dellarocas, George Wyner, John Quimby, Charley Osborn, Abraham Bernstein, George Herman, Mark Klein, Elisa O’Donnell (1998). “Tools for inventing organizations: Toward a handbook of organizational processes.” Management Science. 45(3).
  33. Klein, M (1997). An Exception Handling Approach to Enhancing Consistency, Completeness and Correctness in Collaborative Requirements Capture. Concurrent Engineering Research and Applications. March 1997.
  34. Klein, M. (1996). Workshop Report: Thirteenth International Distributed AI Workshop. AI Magazine. 17(1):1996.
  35. Klein, M. (1996) Core Services for Coordination in Concurrent Engineering. Computers in Industry. 9:105-115.
  36. Klein, M. (1995) Conflict Management as Part of an Integrated Exception Handling Approach. AI in Engineering Design Analysis and Manufacturing. Volume 9, Pages 259-267, 1995.
  37. Klein, M.(1995) iDCSS: Integrating Workflow, Conflict and Rationale-Based Concurrent Engineering Coordination Technologies. Concurrent Engineering Research and Applications.Volume 3, Number 1, January 1995.
  38. Klein, M. (1994) Computer-Supported Conflict Management in Concurrent Engineering: Introduction to Special Issue. Concurrent Engineering Research and Applications. Volume 2, Number 3, December 1994.
  39. Klein, M. (1995) Integrated Coordination in Cooperative Design. Production Economics. Special issue on Integration and Collaboration Systems. 1995.
  40. Klein, M. (1993) Capturing Design Rationale in Concurrent Engineering Teams. IEEE Computer.Special Issue on Computer Support for Concurrent Engineering. (26)1:9-47. January, 1993.
  41. Klein, M. (1992) Supporting Conflict Management in Cooperative Design Teams. Group Decision and Negotiation. Special Issue on the 1992 Distributed AI Workshop. 2:259-278, 1993.
  42. Klein, M. (1992) Detecting and Resolving Conflicts Among Cooperating Human and Machine-Based Design Agents. Artificial Intelligence in Engineering. 7(2):93-104, 1992.
  43. Klein, M. (1991) Supporting Conflict Resolution in Cooperative Design Systems. IEEE Transactions on Systems, Man and Cybernetics. Special Issue on Distributed Artificial Intelligence. 21(6).
  44. Klein, M., Lu, S. C-Y. (1990) Conflict Resolution in Cooperative Design. Artificial Intelligence in Engineering. 4(4):168-180, 1990.

Crowdmining

One of the biggest challenges facing 21st century institutions is figuring out how to mine useful insights from the vast data sets now available to us. Current data mining technologies allow us to generate compressed views of large data sets, but lack people’s ability to figure out what they mean and thereby create actionable intelligence. My goal is to achieve this by engaging crowds in scouring big data for insights, creating, building upon and critiquing each other’s hypotheses about what the data has to say. This capability can then be used for applications ranging from business and government data analytics to intelligence analysis.

Deliberative Predictive Markets

Prediction markets represent a promising technique for assessing the likelihood of future scenarios, but are limited by the fact that crowd members do not share the reasons and evidence underlying their judgments, so participants can often make poorly-informed assessments. The goal of this project is to develop a deliberative prediction market framework wherein crowd members, supported by data-intensive analytics, share and evaluate the rationale for their assessments, in addition to just entering scenario probability estimates.

Conference Publications
  1. Xu, C., Li, Y., Zhang, W., Klein, M., Zhao, S., & Tharatipyakul, A. (2017). CrowdMOD: Crowdsourced Moderation for Structured Online Deliberation. Proceedings of the International Conference on Deliberation and Decision Making. Singapore.
  2. Klein, Fujita, Ito (2017). Enabling Large Scale Deliberation using Ideation and Negotiation-Support Agents. Proceedings of the US-Japan Workshop on Collaborative Global Research on Applying Information Technology, IEEE International Conference on Distributed Computing. Atlanta, USA.
  3. Klein, M., Gruzd, A., & Lannigan, J. (2017). Using Deliberation-Centric Social Network Analysis to Assess Interactive Signed Ties. Proceedings of Sunbelt. Beijing, China.
  4. Hoz, E. D. L. H. D. L., Marsa-Maestre, I., Gimenez-Guzman, J. M.,David Orden, Klein, M. (2017). Multi-agent nonlinear negotiation for Wi-Fi channel assignment. 16th International Conference on Autonomous Agents and Multiagent Systems (AAMAS2017).
  5. Maestre, I. M., Hoz, E. D. L., Gimenez-Guzman, J. M.,David Orden, Klein, M. (2016). Nonlinear negotiation approaches for complex-network optimization: a study inspired by Wi-Fi channel assignment. Proceedings of the COREDEMA Workshop, held in conjunction with ECAI 2016.
  6. Xu, C., Li, Y., Zhang, W., Klein, M., & Zhao, S. (2016). Towards Greater Perceived Fairness: Crowdsourcing Moderation Work to Online Deliberation Participants. In V. Pipek & M. Rohde (Eds.), International Reports on Socio-Informatics. International Institute for Socio-Informatics.
  7. Garcia, A. C. B., & Klein, M. (2015). Making sense of large-group discussions using rhetorically structured text. Proceedings of the International Conference on Social Media Technologies, Communication, and Informatics.
  8. Marsa-Maestre, I., Hoz, E. d. l., Jonker, C. M., & Klein, M. (2015). Using graph properties to enable better negotiations in complex self-interested networks. In Proceedings of The Eighth International Workshop on Agent-based Complex Automated Negotiations (ACAN 2015). Springer.
  9. Aydogan, R., Marsa-Maestre, I., Klein, M., & Jonker, C. M. (2015). A Machine Learning Approach for Mechanism Selection in Complex Negotiations. In Proceedings of The Eighth International Workshop on Agent-based Complex Automated Negotiations (ACAN 2015). Springer.
  10. Zhang, S., Klein, M., & Marsa-Maestre, I. (2014). Scalable Complex Contract Negotiation With Structured Search and Agenda Management. Proceedings of the Twenty-Eighth AAAI Conference on Artificial Intelligence (AAAI-14).
  11. Spada, P., & Klein, M. (2014). Argument Maps and Epistemic Outcomes of Large Groups e-deliberation. Proceedings of the American Political Science Association Annual Meeting.
  12. Hoz, E., Lopez-Carmona, M., Klein, M., & Marsa-Maestre, I. (2013). Consortium Formation Using a Consensus Policy Based Negotiation Framework. In T. Ito, M. Zhang, V. Robu, & T. Matsuo (Eds.), Complex Automated Negotiations: Theories, Models, and Software Competitions (pp. 3-22). Springer Berlin Heidelberg.
  13. Klein, M., Spada, P., & Calabretta, R. (2012). Enabling Deliberations in a Political Party Using Large-Scale Argumentation: A Preliminary Report. Proceedings of the 10th International Conference on the Design of Cooperative Systems.
  14. Zhang, S. X. & Klein, M. (2012). Hierarchical Negotiation Model for Complex Problems With Large-number of Interdependent Issues. Proceedings of The 2012 International Conference on Intelligent Agent Technology.
  15. Hoz, E. D. L., Lopez-Carmona, M. A., Klein, M., & Maestre,I. M. (2012). Hierarchical Clustering and Linguistic Mediation Rules for Multi-agent Negotiation. Proceedings from the Workshop on Agent-based ComplexAutomated Negotiations (ACAN-2012).
  16. Hoz, E. d. l., Carmona, M. A. L., Klein, M., &Marsa-Maestre, I. (2012). Hierarchical Clustering and Linguistic Mediation Rules for Multi-agent Negotiation. Proceedings from the Conference on Autonomous Agents and Multi agent Systems (AAMAS).
  17. Sorensen, J., B. Jorgensen, M. Klein and Y. Demazeau (2011). An Agent-based Extensible Climate Control System for Sustainable Greenhouse Production. The 14th International Conference on Principles and Practice of Multi-Agent Systems (PRIMA-2011). Wollongong, Australia, Springer.
  18. Maestre, I. M., M. Klein, E. D. L. Hoz and M. A. Lopez-Carmona (2011). Negowiki: a set of community tools for the consistent comparison of negotiation approaches. The 14thInternational Conference on Principles and Practice ofMulti-Agent Systems (PRIMA-2011). Wollongong, Australia, Springer.
  19. Hoz, E. D. L., M. Á. L. Carmona, M. Klein and I. M. Maestre (2011). Consensus Policy Based Multi-Agent Negotiation.The 14th International Conference on Principles and Practice of Multi-Agent Systems (PRIMA-2011). Wollongong, Australia, Springer.
  20. Fujita, K., M. Klein, and T. Ito (2011). Efficient Issue-Grouping Approach for Multi-Issues Negotiation between Exaggerator Agents. National Conference on Artificial Intelligence (AAAI-2011).
  21. Klein, M. (2011). Managing Emergence in Large-Scale Deliberation. International Conference on Complex Systems. Boston MA.
  22. Fujita, K., Ito, T., & Klein, M. (2012). The Effect of Grouping Issues in Multiple Interdependent Issues Negotiation based on Cone-Constraints. In T. Ito, M. Zhang, V. Robu, S. Fatima, & T. Matsuo (Eds.), New Trends in Agent-Based Complex Automated Negotiations (pp. 39-55). Springer Berlin Heidelberg.
  23. Fujita, K., Ito, T., & Klein, M. (2013). The Effect of Grouping Issues in Multiple Interdependent Issues Negotiation between Exaggerator Agents. In T. Ito, M. Zhang, V. Robu, & T. Matsuo (Eds.), Complex Automated Negotiations: Theories, Models, and Software Competitions (pp. 23-39). Springer Berlin Heidelberg.
  24. Marsa-Maestre, I., M. A. L. Carmona and M. Klein (2011). A Scenario Generation Framework for Consistent Comparison of Negotiation Approaches. The Fourth International Workshop on Agent-based Complex Automated Negotiations (ACAN 2011). Taipei, Taiwan.
  25. Hoz, E., Lopez-Carmona, M., Klein, M., & Marsa-Maestre, I. (2011). Consensus Policy Based Multi-agent Negotiation. In D. Kinny, J.-j. Hsu, G. Governatori, & A. Ghose (Eds.), Agents in Principle, Agents in Practice (pp. 159-173). Springer Berlin Heidelberg.
  26. Fujita, K., T. Ito and M. Klein (2011). Scalable and Efficient Negotiation Protocol: Decomposing the Contract Space based on Idea of Issue-Grouping. Workshop on Multi-Agent Systems and Collaborative Technologies. Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA.
  27. Klein, M. (2010). Using Metrics to Enable Large-Scale Deliberation. Collective Intelligence In Organizations: A Workshop of the ACM Group 2010 Conference. Sanibel Island, Florida, USA.
  28. Klein, M. (2011). The MIT Deliberatorium: Enabling Large-Scale Deliberation About Complex Systemic Problems. InternationalConference on Agents and Artificial Intelligence. Rome, Italy.
  29. Fujita, K., T. Ito and M. Klein (2010). An Approach to Scalable Multi-issue Negotiation: Decomposing the Contract Space based on Issue Interdependencies. IEEE/WIC/ACMInternational Conference on Intelligent Agent Technology. Toronto Ontario Canada.
  30. Iandoli, L., A. Gurkan, M. Klein and G. Zollo (2010). Supporting on-line large-scale distributed decision making through online argumentation. Eleventh Annual GlobalInformation Technology Management (GITMA) World Conference. Washington, D.C., USA.
  31. Katsuhide Fujita, Takayuki Ito, and Mark Klein (2009). A Secure and Fair Negotiation Protocol in Highly Complex Utility Space based on Cone-Constraints. IEEE/WIC/ACM InternationalConference on Intelligent Agent Technology
  32. Marsa-Maestre, I., M. A. Lopez-Carmona, T. Ito, M. Klein, K. Fujita and J. R. Velasco (2009). Constraint and Bid Quality Factor for Bidding and Deal Identification in Complex Automated Negotiations. Second International Workshop on Agent-based Complex Automated Negotiations. Budapest, Hungary.
  33. Fujita, K., Ito, T., & Klein, M. (2011). Common Testbed Generating Tool Based on XML for Multiple Interdependent Issues Negotiation Problems. In T. Ito, M. Zhang, V. Robu, S. Fatima, T. Matsuo, & H. Yamaki (Eds.),Innovations in Agent-Based Complex Automated Negotiations (pp. 89-105). Springer Berlin Heidelberg.
  34. Iandoli, L., M. Klein, G. Zollo, and A. Gurkan (2009). Leveraging Collective intelligence for Large Scale Global Deliberation, in Tenth Annual Global Information TechnologyManagement (GITMA) World Conference. Mexico City, Mexico.
  35. Marsa-Maestre, I., Ito, T., Fujita, K., Lopez-Carmona, M. A., Velasco, J. R., & Klein, M. (2009). Balancing Utility and Deal Probability for Negotiations in Highly Nonlinear Utility Spaces. Twenty-First International Joint Conference on Artificial Intelligence (IJCAI-09).
  36. Fujita, K., T. Ito, and M. Klein (2009). A Secure Protocol with Approximated Fairness in Multiple Interdependent Issue Negotiation, in The Eighth International Conference on Autonomous Agents and Multiagent Systems.
  37. Fujita, K., Ito, T., & Klein, M. (2008). Preliminary Result on Secure Protocols for Multiple Issue Negotiation Problems. In T. Bui, T. Ho, & Q. Ha (Eds.) Intelligent Agents and Multi-Agent Systems(pp. 161-172). Springer Berlin Heidelberg.
  38. Fujita, K., T. Ito, and M. Klein (2008). Preliminary Results on Secure Protocols for Multiple Issue Negotiation Problems. In: Eleventh Pacific Rim International Conference on Multi-agents(PRIMA 2008). Hanoi, Vietnam.
  39. Klein, M., R. Metzler, and Y. Bar-Yam (2008). Handling Resource Oscillations Through Selective Misinformation. In:UnifyingThemes in Complex Systems: Proceedings of the FifthInternational Conference on Complex Systems (ICCS04), Y. Bar-Yam, A. Minai, and D. Braha, Editors. Springer Complexity.
  40. Klein, M. and L. Iandoli (2008). Supporting Collaborative Deliberation Using a Large-Scale Argumentation System: The MIT Collaboratorium. In: Directions and Implications of Advanced Computing; Conference on Online Deliberation(DIAC-2008/OD2008). University of California, Berkeley.
  41. Katsuhide Fujita, Takayuki Ito, Mark Klein.(2008) A Multi-Round Persuasion based on Revealed Private Utility Space In Multi Issue Negotiations. In: Proceedings of the The Seventh International Joint Conference on Autonomous Agents and Multi-Agent Systems (AAMAS-08). 2008.
  42. Iandoli, L. and M. Klein (2007). Channeling the wisdom of the crowds: how large scale collaborative platforms can effectively leverage collective intelligence. In: The XIV Congress of International Association for Fuzzy-Set Management and Economy: Computational Intelligence Applied to New Digital Economy and Business Ecosystems. 2007: Poiana Brasov – Romania.
  43. Hattori, H., M. Klein, and T. Ito (2007). A Multi-Phase Protocol for Negotiation with Interdependent Issues. In:International Conference on Intelligent Agent Technology.IEEE Computer Society Press.
  44. Kiefer, C., Bernstein, A., Lee, H. J., Klein, M., and Stocker, M. (2007). Semantic Process Retrieval with iSPARQL. In:European Semantic Web Conference (ESWC-07). Springer-Verlag.
  45. Klein, M. (2007). Achieving Collective Intelligence via Large-Scale On-line Argumentation. In: Second International Conference on Internet and Web Applications and Services(ICIW’07). Mauritius, IEEE.
  46. Hattori, H., M. Klein, and T. Ito (2007). Using Iterative Narrowing to Enable Multi-Party Negotiations with Multiple Interdependent Issues. In: Sixth International Joint Conference on Autonomous Agents and Multi-Agent Systems. : Honolulu, Hawaii.
  47. Poltrock, S. and M. Klein (2007). A Coordination-Theoretic Model of the Military Decision-Making Process. In: Annual Conference of the International Technology Alliance. University of Maryland.
  48. Ito, T., M. Klein, and H. Hattori (2007). Multi-issue Negotiation Protocol for Agents: Exploring Nonlinear Utility Spaces. In: Twentieth International Joint Conference on Artificial Intelligence. Hyderabad, India.
  49. H. Hattori, T. Ito, and M. Klein (2006). A Bidding-Based Negotiation Protocol for Agents with Nonlinear Utility Functions. In: Joint Agent Workshops and Symposium 2006 (JAWS-2006), Suzuka, Japan, Oct. 25 – 27. This was selected as one of the top 3 papers, among 70 accepted.
  50. Ito, T., M. Klein, et al. (2006). A Negotiation Protocol for Agents with Nonlinear Utility Functions. In: 21st National Conference on Artificial Intelligence (AAAI-06). Boston MA.
  51. Ito, T. and M. Klein. (2006) A Multi-Issue Negotiation Protocol among Competitive Agents based on Auctions. In: FifthInternational Joint Conference on Autonomous Agents &Multi Agent Systems. Hakodate Japan.
  52. Takayuki Ito, M. K., Hiromitsu Hattori (2006). A Multi-Issue Negotiation Protocol among Nonlinear Utility Agents : A Preliminary Report. In: 2nd International Workshop on Rational, Robust, and Secure Negotiations in Multi-AgentSystems.
  53. Bernstein, A., E. Kaufmann, C. Bürki, and M. Klein (2005). How Similar Is It? Towards a Personalized Similarity Measure in Ontologies. In: Internationale TagungWirtschaftsinformatik. pps 1347-1366
  54. Klein, M., R. Metzler, and Y. Bar-Yam (2004). Handling Emergent Resource Use Oscillations. In: Eighth International Conference on Knowledge-Based Intelligent Information and Engineering Systems (KES 2004), M.G. Negoita, R.J. Howlett, and L.C. Jain, Editors. Springer-Verlag: Heidelberg. p. 809.
  55. Klein, M. and Y. Bar-Yam (2004). Handling Resource Use Oscillation in Multi-Agent Markets. In: Workshop on Agent-Mediated Electronic Commerce V, P. Faratin, D.C. Parkes, and J.A. Rodriguez-Aguilar, Editors. 2004, Springer-Verlag: Heidelberg. p. 145.
  56. Bernstein, A., E. Kaufmann, C. Burki, and M. Klein (2004). Object Similarity in Ontologies: A Foundation for Business Intelligence Systems and High-performance Retrieval. In: International Conference on Information Systems. Washington, D.C., USA. Pgs 11-25.
  57. Klein, M., R. Metzler, Y. Bar-Yam. (2004). Handling Emergent Resource Use Oscillations. In: 7th Pacific RimInternational Workshop on Multi-Agents (PRIMA 2004). M. Barley, N. Kasabov and I. Watson, Eds.. Auckland, New Zealand, Springer-Verlag. (this paper was selected as one of the top three papers at the workshop)
  58. Parsons, S. and M. Klein (2004). Exception handling to enable robust open multi-agent systems. In: The Third International Joint Conference on Autonomous Agents and Multi Agent Systems. New York, NY USA.
  59. Klein, M. (2004). A Knowledge-Based Methodology for Designing Reliable Multi-Agent Systems. In: Fourth International Workshop on Agent-Oriented Software Engineering. P. Giorgini, J. Müller and J. Odell (Eds). Springer-Verlag.
  60. Klein, M. and Y. Bar-Yam. Handling Resource Use Oscillation in Multi-Agent Markets. In: AAMAS Workshop on Agent-Mediated Electronic Commerce V. 2003. Melbourne Australia.
  61. Klein, M., P. Faratin, H. Sayama, and Y. Bar-Yam. Negotiation Algorithms for Collaborative Design Settings. In: 10th ISPE International Conference on Concurrent Engineering Research and Applications (CERA-03). 2003. Madeira Island, Portugal.
  62. Mark Klein. A Knowledge-Based Methodology for Designing Reliable Agent Systems. In: 2nd International Workshop on Software Engineering for Large-Scale Multi-Agent Systems. 2003. Portland, Oregon – USA.
  63. Klein, M., H. Sayama, et al. (2002). A Complex Systems Perspective on Collaborative Design. In: International Conference on Complex Systems. Springer-Verlag.
  64. Mark Klein, Hiroki Sayama, Peyman Faratin, Yaneer Bar-Yam (2002). A Complex Systems Perspective on How Agents Can Support Collaborative Design. In: Workshop on Agents inDesign, Cambridge MA.
  65. Mark Klein, Peyman Faratin and Yaneer Bar-Yam. (2002). Using an Annealing Mediator to Solve the Prisoners’ Dilemma in the Negotiation of Complex Contracts. In: Agent-Mediated Electronic Commerce (AMEC-IV) Workshop, Autonomous Agents and Multi-Agent Systems (AAMAS-02) conference, Bologna Italy. 2002/
  66. Mark Klein, Hiroki Sayama, Peyman Faratin, Yaneer Bar-Yam. A Complex Systems Perspective on Collaborative Design. In:”MAS Problem Spaces and Their Implications to Achieving Globally Coherent Behavior” workshop at the International Conference on Autonomous Agents and Multi-Agent Systems. 2002. Bologna Italy: AAAI Press.
  67. A. Bernstein and M. Klein. Discovering Services: Towards High-Precision Service Retrieval. In: “Web Services, E-Business and Semantic Web Workshop” at the fourteenth international Conference on Advanced Information Systems Engineering (CAiSE-2002). 2002. Toronto Canada.
  68. A. Bernstein, M. Klein. Towards High-Precision Service Retrieval. In: International Semantic Web Conference. Sardinia Italy. June 9 – 12, 2002.
  69. Klein, M., C. Dellarocas, and J.A. Rodriguez-Aguilar. A Knowledge-Based Methodology for Designing Robust Multi-Agent Systems. In: Conference on Autonomous Agents and Multi-Agent Systems. 2002. Bologna Italy: AAAI Press.
  70. M. Klein, P. Faratin, H. Sayama, Y. Bar-Yam. Negotiating Complex Contracts. In: Conference on Autonomous Agents and Multi-Agent Systems. 2001. Bologna Italy: AAAI Press.
  71. Klein, M. (2001). A Repository of Knowledge About Handling Exceptions in Multi-agent Systems. Proceedings of the Fifth International Conference on Autonomous Agents, pps 143–144.
  72. Klein, M., A. Bernstein (2001). Searching for services on the semantic web using process ontologies. In: First Semantic Web Working Symposium (SWWS-1). Stanford (CA US), July 29th-August 1st, 2001.
  73. Klein, M., P. Faratin, H. Sayama, Y. Bar-Yam (2001). Negotiating Complex Contracts. In: AAAI Fall Symposium on Autonomous Negotiating Systems, 2001. Falmouth, MA, USA. AAAI Press.
  74. Faratin, P., M. Klein., H. Sayama and Y. Bar-Yam (2001). Simple Negotiating Agents in Complex Games: Emergent Equilibria and Dominance of Strategies. In: Eighth International Workshop on Agent Theories,.Architectures and Languages (ATAL). 2001. Seattle, USA.
  75. Faratin, P. and M. Klein. Automated Contract Negotiation and Execution as a System of Constraints. In: IJCAI-01 Workshop on Distributed Constraint Reasoning. 2001. Seattle WA USA.
  76. M. Klein. H. Sayama, P. Faratin, Y. Bar-Yam. What Complex Systems Research Can Teach Us About Collaborative Design. In:International Workshop on CSCW in Design. IEEE Press. London. Ontario, Canada. 2001.
  77. Dellarocas, C., M. Klein, et al. (2000). An Exception-Handling Architecture for Software Agent Marketplaces based on the Contract Net Protocol. In: ACM Conference on ElectronicCommerce 2000, Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA.
  78. B. P. Woolf, V. Lesser, C. Eliot, Z. Eyler-Walker, and M. Klein. A Digital Marketplace for Education. In: SSGRR 2000International Conference on Advances in Infrastructure forElectronic Business, Science and Education on the Internet. L’Aquila, Italy, 2000.
  79. Dellarocas, C. and M. Klein. An Experimental Evaluation of Domain-Independent Fault Handling Services in Open Multi-Agent Systems. In: 2000 International Conference on Multi-AgentSystem (ICMAS-2000), Boston MA.
  80. M. Klein. Towards a Systematic Repository of Knowledge About Managing Collaborative Design Conflicts. In: International Conference on AI in Design 2000.
  81. C. Dellarocas, M. Klein. Towards civil agent societies: Creating robust, open electronic marketplaces of contract net agents. In: International Conference on Information Systems (ICIS-99), Charlotte, North Carolina USA, December 12-15, 1999.
  82. A. Bernstein, M. Klein and T.W. Malone. The Process Recombinator: A Tool for Generating New Business Process Ideas. In: International Conference on Information Systems(ICIS-99), Charlotte, North Carolina USA, December 12-15, 1999. Nominated for best paper of the conference.
  83. M. Klein and C. Dellarocas. Exception Handling in Agent Systems. In: Third International Conference on AUTONOMOUS AGENTS, Seattle, Washington, 1999.
  84. C. Dellarocas, M. Klein and H. Shrobe. An Architecture for Constructing Self-Evolving Software Systems. In: 3rd International Software Architecture Workshop, Orlando, Florida, November 1-2, 1998.
  85. C. Dellarocas and M. Klein. A Knowledge-Based Approach for Handling Exceptions in Business Processes. In: 8th Workshop on Information Technologies and Systems (WITS’98), Helsinki, Finland, December 12-13, 1998.

This paper won the conference’s

best paper award

    .

Klein. M. Conflict Management as Part of an Integrated Exception Handling Approach. Proceedings of CE98: In: 5thISPE International Conference on Concurrent EngineeringResearch and Applications. 15-17 July 1998. Tokyo, Japan.

Klein, M. Capturing Geometry Rationale for Collaborative Design. In: IEEE Sixth International Workshop on Enabling Technologies: Infrastructure for Collaborative Enterprises(WET ICE ’97). Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA. June 18-20, 1997. IEEE Computer Society Press.

Klein, M. Challenges and Directions for Coordination Science. Proceedings of the Second International Conference on the Design of Cooperative Systems (COOP’96). Juan-les-Pins, France. June 12 – 14, 1996.

Klein, M. An Exception Handling Approach to Enhancing Consistency, Completeness and Correctness in Collaborative Requirements Capture. In: Third ISPE International Conference on Concurrent Engineering. Toronto, Ontario, Canada. August 26-28, 1996. Technomic Publishing Company. In Press.

Klein, M. An Exception Handling Approach to Enhancing Consistency, Completeness and Correctness in Collaborative Requirements Capture. In: International Workshop on CSCW and Design. Beijing, China, May 8-11, 1996. International Academic Publishers, 1996.

Klein, M. Challenges and Directions for Enterprise Integration: A Distributed AI Perspective. In: Joint Working Conference on Modelling and Methodologies for Enterprise Integration (EI-95).Heron Island, Queensland, Great Barrier Reef, Australia. November 11 1995. IFIP Publishing. In Press.

Klein, M. Core Services for Coordination in Concurrent Engineering. In: Fourth International Workshop on Enabling Technologies: Infrastructure for Collaborative Enterprises (WET ICE ’95). Berkeley Springs, West Virginia. April 20-22, 1995.

Klein, M. iDCSS: Integrating Workflow, Conflict and Rationale-Based Concurrent Engineering Coordination Technologies. In: First International Conference on Concurrent Engineering, Research and Applications. Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. August 29-31, 1994. Springer-Verlag Publishers, In Press.

Klein, M. DRCS: An Integrated System for Capture of Designs and Their Rationale. In: Second International Conference on Artificial Intelligence in Design (AID ’92). Pps 393-412. J.S. Gero, Ed. Kluwer Academic Publishers. 1992.

Klein, M. & Lu, S. C-Y. Insight into Cooperative Group Design: Experience with the LAN Design System. In Trends in Artificial Intelligence: 2nd Congress of the Italian Association for Artificial Intelligence, Palermo, Italy, October 1991. Ardizzone, E., Gaglio, S. & Sorbello, E. Eds. Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence 549, Springer-Verlag, pages 354-364, 1991.

Klein, M. & Lu, S. C-Y. Insights Into Cooperative Group Design: Experience With the LAN Designer System. In: Sixth International Conference on Applications of ArtificialIntelligence in Engineering (AIENG ’91). Pages 143-162. G. Rzevski and R.A. Adey, Eds. University of Oxford, UK. July 2-4, 1991.

Klein, M. A Computational Model of Conflict Resolution in Integrated Design. In: ASME Symposium on Integrated Product Design and Manufacturing. ASME 1990 Winter Annual Meeting, Dallas, TX. November 25-30, 1990.

Baskin, A.B. & Klein, M. Knowledge Processing for Cooperative Design. In: 2nd International Conference on Advanced Manufacturing Systems and Technology. Trento, Italy. June 19-21, 1990.

Klein, M. Supporting Conflict Resolution in Cooperative Design. In: 1990 JSAI AI Symposium. Tokyo, Japan. Japanese Society of AI Report SIG-FAI-HICG-KBS-9001. December 6, 1990.

Klein, M. & Baskin, A.B. A Computational Model for Conflict Resolution in Cooperative Design Systems. In: International Working Conference on Cooperating Knowledge Based Systems(CKBS ’90). Dake Centre, University of Keele, England. October 3-5, 1990. Springer-Verlag London Ltd.

Klein, M. & Lu, S. C-Y. & Baskin, A.B. Towards a Theory of Conflict Resolution in Cooperative Design. In: 23rd Annual Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences. Honolulu, Hawaii. January 2-5, 1990.

Lu, S. C-Y., Subramanyam, S., Thompson, J.B. and Klein, M. A Cooperative Product Development Environment To Realize The Simultaneous Engineering Concept. In: 1989 ASME Computers in Engineering Conference. Anaheim, CA. July 30-August 2, 1989.

Baskin, A.B., Stepp, R.E., Lu, S.C-Y. & Klein, M. Integrated Design as a Cooperative Problem Solving Activity. In: 22nd Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences. Honolulu, Hawaii. January 1989.

Book Chapters
  1. Marsa-Maestre, I., Jonker, C., Klein, M., & Hoz, E. D. L. (2017). Using Graph Properties and Clustering Techniques to Select Division Mechanisms for Scalable Negotiations. In Modern Approaches to Agent-based Complex Automated Negotiation. Springer International Publishing AG.
  2. Marsa-Maestre, I., Lopez-Carmona, M. A.,Enrique de la Hoz, Klein, M. (2012). Mediated Heuristic Approaches and Alternative Social Welfare Definitions for Complex Contract Negotiations Involving Highly Uncorrelated Utility Spaces. In R. Laratta (Ed.), Social Welfare. INTECH.
  3. Iandoli, L., Introne, J., & Klein, M. (2012). Rating in Large-Scale Argumentation Systems. In H. Masum & M. Tovey (Eds.). The Reputation Society: how online opinions are reshaping the offline world. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.
  4. Ito, T., Fukuta, N., & Klein, M. (2011). An Approach to Sharing Business Process Models in Agile-Style Global Software Engineering. In R. Lee (Ed.) Computers,Networks, Systems, and Industrial Engineering 2011 (pp. 155-170). Springer Berlin Heidelberg.
  5. Fujita, K., T. Ito and M. Klein (2011). Scalable Negotiation Protocol based on Issue-Grouping for Highly Nonlinear Situation. In: Decision Making with Multiple Imperfect Decision Makers. T. Guy, Springer.
  6. Petti, C. and M. Klein (2009). Organizational Change, IT, and Business Process Redesign. A methodology for turning this relationship virtuous. In: Handbook of Research on Complex Dynamic Process Management. M. M. Wang and Z. Sun, IGI Global.
  7. Mark Klein. Achieving collective intelligence via large-scale argumentation. In: Collective Intelligence: Creating a Prosperous World at Peace. Ed, Mark Tovey. 2008.
  8. Dellarocas, C., & Klein, M. (2000). Civil Agent Societies: Tools for Inventing Open Agent-Mediated Electronic Marketplaces. In A. Moukas, F. Ygge, & C. Sierra (Eds.), Agent Mediated Electronic Commerce II (pp. 24-39). Springer Berlin Heidelberg.
  9. Klein, M., H. Sayama, et al. (2006). The Dynamics of Collaborative Design: Insights From Complex Systems and Negotiation Research. Complex Engineered Systems: Science Meets Technology. D. Braha, A. Minai and Y. Bar-Yam, Springer: 158.
  10. Klein, M., P. Faratin, et al. (2006). Negotiation algorithms for collaborative design settings. Complex Engineered Systems: Science Meets Technology. D. Braha, A. Minai and Y. Bar-Yam, Springer: 246.
  11. Mark Klein, et al., An Annealing Protocol for Negotiating Complex Contracts, in Handbook of Research on Nature Inspired Computing for Economy and Management. D.J.-P. Rennard, Editor. 2006, Idea Group, Inc.
  12. Malone, T.W., et al., Tools for Inventing Organizations: Toward a Handbook of Organizational Processes, in Organizing Business Knowledge: The MIT Process Handbook, T.W. Malone, K. Crowston, and G.A. Herman, Editors. 2003, MIT Press: Cambridge MA USA.
  13. Klein, M., Towards a Systematic Repository of Knowledge about Managing Collaborative Design Conflicts, in Organizing Business Knowledge: The MIT Process Handbook, T.W. Malone, K. Crowston, and G.A. Herman, Editors. 2003, MIT Press: Cambridge MA USA.
  14. Klein, M. and C. Dellarocas, Designing Robust Business Processes, in Organizing Business Knowledge: The MIT Process Handbook, T.W. Malone, K. Crowston, and G.A. Herman, Editors. 2003, MIT Press: Cambridge MA USA.
  15. Klein, M., et al., Inventing New Business Processing Using a Process Repository, in Organizing Business Knowledge: The MIT Process Handbook, T.W. Malone, K. Crowston, and G.A. Herman, Editors. 2003, MIT Press: Cambridge MA USA.
  16. Bernstein, A., M. Klein, and T.W. Malone, The Process Recombinator: A Tool for Generating New Business Process Ideas, in Organizing Business Knowledge: The MIT Process Handbook, T.W. Malone, K. Crowston, and G.A. Herman, Editors. 2003, MIT Press: Cambridge MA USA.
  17. Klein, M. A Knowledge-Based Methodology for Designing Reliable Multi-Agent Systems, in Advances in Software Engineering for Large-Scale Multi-Agent Systems, C.J.P.d. Lucena, et al., Editors. Springer-Verlag. In press.
  18. Klein, M., P. Faratin, et al. Negotiation Algorithms for Collaborative Design Settings. In: Complex Engineering Systems. D. Braha, Ed. In press.
  19. Klein, M., H. Sayama, P. Faratin, and Y. Bar-Yam, A Complex Systems Perspective on Collaborative Design, in Multi-AgentSystems: An Application Science, T. Wagner, Editor. 2003, Kluwer.
  20. Faratin, P., M. Klein, H. Samaya, and Y. Bar-Yam (2002). Simple Negotiating Agents in Complex Games: Emergent Equilibria and Dominance of Strategies. In Intelligent Agent VIII:Agent Theories, Architectures, and Languages. 2002, Springer Verlag. p. 367–377.
  21. Klein, M., Sayama, H., Faratin, P., & Bar-Yam, Y. (2003). A Complex Systems Perspective on How Agents Can Support Collaborative Design. In Y. Ye & E. F. Churchill (Eds.), Agent Supported Cooperative Work (pp. 255-271). Kluwer Academic Publishers.
  22. Dellarocas, C., & Klein, M. (2001). Contractual Agent Societies. In R. Conte & C. Dellarocas (Eds.), Social Order in Multiagent Systems (pp. 113-133). Springer US.
  23. Klein, M. and A. Bernstein, Searching for Services on the Semantic Web using Process Ontologies, in Semantic Web, I.F. Cruz, et al., Editors. 2002, IOS Press.
  24. Woolf, B. P., V. Lesser, et al. (2000). A Digital Market Place for Education. In: The Internet and Education. V. Milutinovic and F. Patricelli, Editors.
  25. Kecheng Liu, Mark Fox, Peter Apers, Mark Klein, Albert Cheng, Ronald Stamper, Satya Chattopadhyay and Thomas Greene. Enterprise Information Systems: Issues, Challenges and Viewpoints. Joaquim Filipe, Editor. In EnterpriseInformation Systems, pages 1-13, Kluwer Academic Publishers,1999.
  26. Dellarocas, C. and M. Klein. A Knowledge-Based Approach for Designing Robust Business Processes. In Business Process Management: Models, Techniques, and Empirical Studies. Wil van der Aalst, Jörg Desel and Andreas Oberweis, Eds. Lecture Notes on Computer Science. Springer Verlag, Germany. In press.
  27. Klein, M. Collaborative Capture of Geometry Rationale. In Cooperative Knowledge Processing for Engineering Design. Arthur B. Baskin, Gianni Jacucci and George L. Kovacs, Eds. Chapman & Hall, UK. 1998.
  28. Klein, M. Coordination Science: Challenges and Directions. In Coordination Technology for Collaborative Applications. Wolfram Conen and Gustaf Neumann, Eds. Lecture Notes in Computer Science, LNCS, Volume 1364. Springer Publishing, 1997.
  29. Klein, M. Challenges and Directions for Enterprise Integration: A Distributed AI Perspective. In Modeling and Methodologies for Enterprise Integration. P. Bernus and L. Nemes, Eds. Chapman & Hall, May 1996.
  30. Klein, M. Integrated Support for Process, Conflict and Rationale Management in Cooperative Design. In Handbook ofManufacturing and Automation. Prof Andre Kusiak, Ed. John Wiley & Sons. 1994.
  31. Klein, M. Integrated Support for Cooperative Design Coordination: Managing Processes, Conflicts and Memories. NATO Advanced Research Workshop on Integration,Information and Collaboration Models. Pisa, Italy. June 6-11, 1993. Kluwer Publishers. In Press.
  32. Klein, M. Computer-Supported Conflict Management in Design Teams. In Design Issues in CSCW. Rosenberg, Duska and Hutchison, Chris, Eds. Springer-Verlag. 1994.

Technical Reports
  1. Mark Klein (2017). Towards Crowd-Scale Deliberation.
  2. Ana Cristina Bicharra Garcia, Mark Klein (2015). Making Sense of Large-Group Discussion Using Automatically Generated RST-Based Explanations.
  3. Mark Klein, Ana Cristina Bicharra Garcia (2014). The Bag of Lemons: High-Speed Idea Filtering for Open Innovation.
  4. Mark Klein, Luca Iandoli (2008). Supporting Collaborative Deliberation Using a Large-Scale Argumentation System: The MIT Collaboratorium. MIT Sloan Research Paper No. 4691-08.
  5. Mark Klein (2008). The MIT Collaboratorium: Enabling Effective Large-Scale Deliberation for Complex Problems. MIT Sloan Research Paper No. 4679-08.
  6. Luca Iandoli and Mark Klein (2008). Can We Exploit Collective Intelligence for Collaborative Deliberation? The Case of the Climate Change Collaboratorium. MIT Sloan Research Paper No. 4675-08.
  7. Klein, M., S. Poltrock, and M. Handel (2007). A Coordination-Theoretic Approach to Understanding Process Differences. MIT Sloan Research Paper No. 4637-07.
  8. Takayuki Ito, Mark Klein, Hiromitsu Hattori (2006). An Auction-Based Negotiation Protocol for Agents with Nonlinear Utility Functions.Working paper ROMA-2006-2. MIT: Cambridge MA USA.
  9. Takayuki Ito, Mark Klein, Hiromitsu Hattori (2006). A Multi-Issue Negotiation Protocol among Nonlinear Utility Agents : A Preliminary Report.Working paper ROMA-2006-1. MIT: Cambridge MA USA.
  10. Parsons, S., J.A. Rodriguez-Aguilar, and M. Klein (2003). A Bluffer’s Guide to Auctions. MIT Sloan School of Management: Cambridge MA USA.
  11. Parsons, S. and M. Klein (2003). Diagnosing Faults in Open Distributed Systems. MIT: Cambridge MA USA.
  12. Parsons, S. and M. Klein (2003). Notes on Diagnosis for Open and Distributed Systems. MIT: Cambridge MA USA.
  13. Mark Klein, Yaneer Bar-Yam (2001). Handling Emergent Dysfunctions in Open Peer-to-Peer Systems. ROMA Working Paper ROMA-WP-2001-03. Cambridge MA USA, Massachusetts Institute of Technology.
  14. Mark Klein, Juan Antonio Rodriguez-Aguilar, Chrysanthos Dellarocas (2000). Using Domain-Independent Exception Handling Services to Enable Robust Open Multi-Agent Systems: The Case of Agent Death. ASES Working Paper ASES-WP-2000-05. Cambridge MA USA, Massachusetts Institute of Technology.
  15. Mark Klein (2000). Using Role Commitment Violation Analysis to Identify Exceptions in Open Multi-Agent Systems. ASES Working Paper ASES-WP-2000-04. Cambridge MA USA, Massachusetts Institute of Technology.
  16. Klein, M. & Dellarocas, C. (2000). A Systematic Repository of Knowledge About Handling Exceptions in Business Processes. ASES Working Paper ASES-WP-2000-03. Cambridge MA USA, Massachusetts Institute of Technology. August, 2000.
  17. Klein, M. & Dellarocas, C. (2000). Domain-Independent Exception Handling Services That Increase Robustness in Open Multi-Agent Systems. ASES Working Report ASES-WP-2000-02. Cambridge MA USA, Massachusetts Institute of Technology. 2000.
  18. Klein, M. & Dellarocas, C. (2000). Towards a Systematic Repository of Knowledge about Managing Multi-Agent System Exceptions. ASES Working Report ASES-WP-2000-01. Cambridge MA USA, Massachusetts Institute of Technology. 2000.
  19. Klein, M. (1998). Towards a Systematic Repository of Knowledge About Managing Collaborative Design Conflicts. CCS Working Paper 210. MIT Center for Coordination Science. Cambridge MA USA. October 1999.
  20. Klein, M. (1998). A Knowledge-Based Approach to Handling Exceptions in Workflow Systems. CCS Working Paper 203. MIT Center for Coordination Science. Cambridge MA USA. April 1998.
  21. Klein, M. (1996). An Exception Handling Approach to Enhancing Consistency, Completeness and Correctness in Collaborative Requirements Capture. ARL Internal Memo. Applied Research Lab, PO Box 30, University Park PA 16804-0030. April 1996.
  22. Klein, M. (1995). Editor, Proceedings of the 13th International Distributed Artificial Intelligence Workshop. AAAI Technical Report. AAAI Press. 1995.
  23. Faragher-Horwell, R., Klein, M. Zarley, D. (1992). Overview and Functional Specifications for TCAPS Task Coordination And Planning System: A Computer-Supported Workflow Management. Boeing Technical Report BCS-G2010-130, December 1992.
  24. Klein, M. (1990). Conflict Resolution in Cooperative Design. PhD Thesis. Technical Report No. UIUCDCS-R-89-1557. Department of Computer Science, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL. January 1990.
  25. Klein, M. (1990). Integrating Vision Cues Using a Multiple Cooperating Knowledge Source Architecture. Technical Report No. UIUCDCS-R-89-1556. Department of Computer Science, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL. January 1990.

Research

Funding

In my 20 years on the soft-funded research track, I’ve won seven million dollars of funding from government, industry and academic sources.
Funding Awards
  1. Co-PI, Designing online news comments to promote the practice of intellectual humility in public discourse. University of Connecticut Humanities Institute, $250K, 2016.
  2. PI, ASSEMBL Harvesting Project, Bluenove Inc, $120K, 2015-2016.
  3. co-PI, CATALYST: Collective Applied Intelligence and Analytics for Social Innovation. European Union FP7. $2,000K, 2013-2015.
  4. PI, Knowledge Management and Interactive Media. Siemens . $400K, 2010-2012.
  5. PI, Empirical Analysis of Large-Scale Argumentation. NSF VOSS program. $250K, 2010-2012.
  6. PI, Protocols for Negotiating Complex Contracts. NSF HCC program. $450K, 2007-2009.
  7. PI, Using Non-Linear Negotiation to Enable the Design of Robust Open Systems. NSF Science of Design program. $133K, 2007-2008.
  8. PI, Sharing Best Practices Among BP Major Projects. BP-MIT Alliance $270K, 2005-2007.
  9. PI, Supply Chain Design Using the Process Handbook. University of Lecce Italy, $160K, 2004-2006
  10. PI, A Repository of Coordination Expertise. Boeing-MIT Alliance $120K, 2004 – 2006.
  11. PI, Always On Infrastructures, Hewlett-Packard Inc, $170K, 2002.
  12. PI, High-Precision Service Retrieval, US Army research Lab, $100K, 2001 – 2004.
  13. PI, Towards Robust Open Multi-Agent Systems: Domain-Independent Exception Handling Services, NSF Computation and Social Systems program, $375K, 2001 – 2004.
  14. PI, Business Process Exception Analysis, $32K, British Telecom, 2000.
  15. co-PI, Auction Mechanism Exception Analysis, Neptune Technologies Inc, $150K, 2000.
  16. co-PI,A Systematic Repository of Conflict Management Expertise for Collaborative Design, contract IIS-9803251, NSF Computation and Social Systems program, $233K, 1998 – 2001.
  17. co-PI, An Exception Handling Service for Software Agent Ensembles, contract F30602-98-2-0099, DARPA CoABS program, $1200K. 1998 -2002.
  18. co-PI, Dynamic Domain Architectures, DARPA ITO Self-Adaptive Software program, August 1998 to July 2001.
  19. PI, Technology for Representing and Supporting Supply Chain Management Processes, Defense Logistics Agency, $450K, 1996 -1999.
  20. PI, Design Rationale Capture To Support Concurrent Engineering Coordination, Applied Research Lab, $200K 1996 -1997.
  21. PI, NII Service Broker, ARPA/DOE NII Interoperability Testbed Project , $200K, 1996 -1997.
  22. PI, Extending RAPID-WS to Support Collaborative Requirements Acquisition, Armstrong Labs, Wright Patterson AFB, $40K, 1995 -1996.
  23. PI, Conflict Management Technology Evaluation, Boeing Computer Services, $40K, 1994.
  24. PI, Design Rationale Capture Tool, Boeing Computer Services, $40K, 1992.

Teaching

& Advising

I have developed and taught full-semester courses on social computing at universities throughout the world, in addition to conference tutorials on multi-agent systems and coordination science. I’ve also advised students at the Masters PhD and post-doc levels at MIT as well as internationally.
Courses Taught (Social Computing)
Nagoya Institute of Technology (2013, 2014, 2015, 2017)
University of Zurich (2012)
Fluminense Federal University (2011)
PhDs and Post-Docs
Carlo Savoretti, Universita Politecnica Delle Marche, Italy
Rafik Hadfi, Nagoya Institute of Technology
Peyman Faratin, City College, London
Juan Antonio Rodriguez-Aguilar, IIIA, Barcelona, Spain
Hiromitsu Hattori, Nagoya Institute of Technology
Katsuhide Fujita, Nagoya Institute of Technology
Nicola Dragoni, University of Trento, Italy
Simon Parsons, City College, London
Masters Students
Ana Karoline Queiroz Romeiro, Universidade Federal Fluminense
Bruno Vieira, Universidade Federal Fluminense
Akiyuki Mori, Nagoya Institute of Technology
Keisuke Hara, Nagoya Institute of Technology
Kohei Hayakawa, Nagoya Institute of Technology
Marco Cioffi, Politecnico di Milano, Italy
Ben Towne, CMU
Jan Sorensen, University of Southern Denmark
Leon Grekin, MIT Management of Technology Program
Lijin Aryananda, MIT EECS
Athica Muthitacharoen, MIT EECS
Zhi-Hui (Winifred) Xu, MIT EECS
David Shue, MIT EECS
Adriana Vivacqua, Universidade Federal Fluminense

Professional

Activities

My professional service has included serving on the advisory boards for commercial startups in the online democracy space, serving on the editorial boards for prominent journals in the AI and social computing space, as well as on the program committees for the top conferences in AI and social computing. I have also been very active in terms of international outreach: I’ve had visiting positions at many universities abroad, and have in turn hosted students and faculty from throughout the world.
Advisory Boards
  • empower, a startup whose goal is to provide the democratically self-governed online marketplace needed to help address poverty issues throughout the world.
  • reassemble, a startup in the online democracy space.
  • ReInvent Democracy, a startup in the online democracy space.
Journal Service
Editorial Board

Reviewer

    • ACM Transactions of Software Engineering
    • ACM Transactions on Interactive Intelligent Systems Decision Support Systems
    • AI Communications
    • AI in Engineering
    • AI in Engineering Design Analysis and Manufacturing
    • Computer-Supported Cooperative Work
    • Concurrent Engineering Research and Applications
    • IEEE System Man and Cybernetics
    • IEEE Computer
    • Knowledge Management & E-Learning
    • MIT Sloan Management Review
    • Social Media for Organizations
    • Transactions on Social Computing
Program Committees
  • Adaptive Workflow Systems, CSCW-98
  • Agent-based Complex Automated Negotiations (ACAN)
  • Agent-Based Systems in The Business Context, AAAI-99
  • Agent-Oriented Software Engineering, ECAI-2000
  • Agents in Design 2002
  • American Association for Artificial Intelligence (AAAI)
  • AP2P (agent-based peer-to-peer), AAMAS-05
  • Artificial Intelligence and Sustainable Design, AAAI Spring Symposium
  • Artificial Intelligence and Sustainable Design, AAAI Spring Symposium
  • Artificial Intelligence in Design (AID)
  • Autonomous Agents and Multi-Agent Systems (AAMAS)
  • Collaboration and Technology (CTS)
  • Collective Intelligence (CI)
  • Communication Models in Collaborative Design, Artificial Intelligence in Design (AID’94)
  • Complex Systems
  • Computational Models of Conflict Management, AAAI-94
  • Computational Models of Conflict Resolution in Cooperative Problem Solving. IJCAI-93
  • Computer-Human Interaction (CHI)
  • Computer-Supported Cooperative Work (CSCW)
  • Concurrent Engineering, Research and Applications (CERA)
  • Conflict Management in Design, Artificial Intelligence in Design (AID) 1994.
  • Conflict Resolution in Decision Making, 2013
  • Cooperating Knowledge Based Systems (CKBS)
  • Cooperative Information Systems (CoopIS)
  • Crowd Intelligence: Foundations, Methods and Practices, 2014
  • Crowdsourcing the Semantic Web, 2013
  • Crowdwork, 2013
  • CSCW in Design
  • Distributed Artificial Intelligence (DAI)
  • E-Business, E-Negotiations and Auctions, Symposium on Applications and the Internet, 2005
  • Engineering Self-Organising Applications, AAMAS-2003
  • ESOA (engineering self-organizing applications), AAMAS-05
  • Flexibility in Process-aware Information Systems, 2006
  • Group Decision and Negotiation (GDN)
  • Intelligent Workflow and Process Management, IJCAI-1999.
  • International Joint Conference on Artificial Intelligence (IJCAI)
  • International Conference on Agents (ICA)
  • Knowledge Sharing and Collaborative Engineering (KSCE)
  • large scale multi-agent system workshop, AAMAS-05
  • Large-Scale Multi-Agent Systems, AAMAS-2004
  • Modelling & Methodologies for Enterprise Integration (EI)
  • Multi-Agent Systems (ICMAS)
  • NATO Advanced Research Workshop on Integration, Information and Collaboration Models.
  • Norms and Institutions in Multi-Agent Systems, AA-2000
  • Programming Multi-Agent Systems, AAMAS-2006
  • Representing Design Rationale, Artificial Intelligence in Design (AID’94)
  • Requirements Conflict Reconciliation, International Conference for Software Engineering (ICSE-97)
  • Self-Adaptive Self-Organizing Systems
  • Social Ideation, CSCW-2011.
  • Social Interaction and Community War, IJCAI-1997
  • Social Media for Crowdsourcing and Human Computation, 2013
  • Software Engineering (ICSE)
  • Workshop on Computational Models of Conflict Management, part of IJCAI-99, 1999
  • Workshop on Enabling Technologies: Infrastructure for Collaborative Enterprises (WET ICE)
Visiting Appointments
  • University of Alcala, Madrid, Spain
  • Social Media Lab at Ryerson University, Toronto, Canada
  • Fluminense Federal University, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
  • Nagoya Institute of Technology (International Professor program), Nagoya, Japan
  • University of Otago, Dunedin, New Zealand
  • AI Research Institute (IIIA), Barcelona, Spain
  • University of Hong Kong
  • University of Naples, Italy
  • University of Zurich, Switzerland
  • PUC-Rio, Rio De Janeiro, Brazil
Affiliate Positions
  • MIT Computer Science and AI Lab (Affiliated Researcher)
  • New England Complex Systems Institute (Faculty Affiliate)
Presentations
I have given scores of invited talks and tutorials on topics related to collective and artificial intelligence, at companies, universities, and conferences in North and South America, Europe, Asia, Australia, and New Zealand. A selection of the most recent presentations include:

2017
Crowd-Scale Pareto-Centric Decision-Making (keynote). NIT International Symposium on Future Informatics
Complex Negotiation Protocols. NEC
The Deliberatorium Project: Deliberation at Scale. Charles River Analytics
2016
The MIT Deliberatorium. Microsoft Research, New York City
The MIT Deliberatorium. New Jersey Institute of Technology
2015
Large Scale Deliberation. Knowledge Media Institute, Open University
Tools for Deliberative Democracy (keynote). Prado Medialab, Madrid Spain.
Challenges and Prospects for Social Computing Technology, Nagoya Institute of Technology
Applications of Crowd Computing, Fujitsu, Japan
Social Computing Technology (tutorial), Nagoya Institute of Technology
2014
Challenges and Directions for Large-Scale Social Ideation. Fluminese Federal University, Brazil
Challenges and Directions for Large-Scale Social Ideation, Arguing on the Web Workshop, Amsterdam
2013
Nonlinear Negotiation. University of Otago, Dunedin, New Zealand.
2012
Crowd Computing and Large-Scale Deliberation. University of Trento, Italy
Crowd Computing and Large-Scale Deliberation. Xerox Research Center, Grenoble France
2011
Large Scale Deliberation. Workshop on Epistemic Democracy in Practice, Yale University
The MIT Deliberatorium. IIIA (Artificial Intelligence Research Center), Barcelona Spain
International Conference on Collaboration Technologies and Systems (keynote). Philadelphia PA
The MIT Deliberatorium: Enabling Large-Scale Deliberation (keynote). ICAART 2011, Rome Italy
Large-Scale Deliberation (keynote). Workshop on Web Epistemics, Center for Interdisciplinary Research, Bielefeld, Germany
Large-Scale Deliberation (keynote). International Conference on Complex Systems
2010
Social Computing Technology (tutorial). University of Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland
Challenges and Prospects for Social Computing (keynote). Social Computer Workshop, Brussels, Belgium
2009
Social Computing. Connected Health Symposium
The MIT Deliberatorium. MIT Summit Conference on Future Networks
Supporting Large-Scale Collaborative Deliberation. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center
Supporting Large-Scale Deliberation (keynote). Workshop on New Directions in Software Technology, St John, US Virgin Islands
Professional Societies
  • American Association of Artificial Intelligence
  • Association of Computing Machinery
  • IEEE

Personal Info

I was born April 13, 1960 in Montreal, Canada. My parents came from Poland, and survived the Holocaust to live in Israel before moving to Canada. My Dad is a gifted engineer and designed automated machinery for assembling small tricky items like pens (which I think triggered my initial interest in complex adaptive systems). He has since retired and now splits his time between Montreal and Israel. My Mom died when I was twelve. I have a sister who is a lawyer and lives in Jerusalem with her husband and triplets born in 1996.

I got my Bachelor’s degree at Dartmouth College between 1977 and 1981, where I majored in Biochemistry with a focus on neuroscience. It was there that I discovered computers, got interested in artificial intelligence (AI), and learned something of the intricate complexity of living systems. I also discovered I wasn’t much good at lab work.

I found an opportunity, after graduating, to combine my interests by working at the Cognitive Psychophysiology Lab (CPL) at the University of Illinois in Urbana-Champaign. It was there that I learned something about how science really works; how to design, run and interpret experiments, how to write scientific papers, and how to develop large computer systems. One study I did on “perfect pitch” was published in Science journal. Believe it or not, I also learned rock climbing in central Illinois, under the influence of some professors in the Psychology Department.

In 1983 I entered graduate school, studying artificial intelligence in the Computer Science Department at the University of Illinois. For my Masters degree I implemented a system that reads simple stories and infers the emotional reactions of the characters, based on a model developed by my thesis advisor, Andrew Ortony.

Around that time I met Janiece Joy Sneegas. We got married in August of 1985, and have stuck together through thick and thin.

For my PhD I worked with my advisors Arthur Baskin and Stephen C-Y Lu to develop a computational model of conflict management in collaborative design. This work was fun because it involved a combination of empirical case studies (I studied some architects at work), theory building, and system development, and it started my current preference for multi-disciplinary coordination science research.

Seeking adventure, I got a position after graduating in 1989 as a visiting researcher at the Hitachi Advanced Research Lab near Tokyo Japan. The year I spent there with Jan opened my eyes to the range of differences in human cultures, and got me enthusiastic about travel.

Upon my return to the US in 1991, I got my first “real” job as an AI specialist in the collaborative computing program at The Boeing Company in Seattle WA. Seattle is a stunning place, and Boeing gave me a great opportunity to learn about how a large corporation coordinates its vast activities. I also was introduced to the world of computer-supported cooperative work (CSCW) by my colleague Stephen Poltrock.

On November 27, 1992 my daughter Hannah Marisha Klein was born, changing and enriching my life in many profound ways. After that, I worked hard to balance professional and personal life.

In 1995 I decided that I wanted to focus more on research than was possible in Boeing, so I took a job as a research scientist at the Pennsylvania State University Applied Research Lab. It was really hard to leave Seattle, but State College turned out to be a serene and friendly place, and the job allowed me to learn the craft of writing grants, developing collaborations, and managing a research group. I really like the research scientist lifestyle; it allows me to focus on research without excessive administrative or teaching committments, and to balance my work with other pursuits.

In 1996 my son Samuel was still-born; the grief Jan, Hannah and I felt has helped us, I think, be more sensitive to the suffering of others and has motivated me to try to contribute something to the world outside my immediate family.

In 1997 MIT called, and after a lot of soul-searching I decided to come join the Center for Coordination Science founded by Tom Malone. MIT is a fantastic place, I think, because of the bright creative people who gather here, and I feel very grateful for this opportunity.

1998 was a pivotal year in my research career. I started up a new line of research, and received several grants to work on it. I have also begun collaborations with folks at the MIT AI Lab, the MIT Department of Civil Engineering, and others. More recently (2000) I was promoted to the rank of Principal Research Scientist. I feel like I have found a true ‘home’ here and am excited about the opportunities it gives me to contribute as a researcher.

Starting in 2006, my research has begun to focus predominantly on applying collective intelligence to sustainability issues. This is an important milestone to me because it means that my research work and personal values have come into alignment in a way that I have been seeking for years. My hope is that my work can help create a loom for weaving our disparate insights into well-grounded wisdom on how to address the truly pressing problems now facing us a species.

In May 2010, I spent a month as a visiting scholar at the University of Hong Kong, hosted by Professor Maggie Wang. I love living abroad, the sense of aliveness I get from being in a place where something puzzling or wonderful or just quirky is always potentially just around the corner. I think what I’m looking for most is visions of how people can live more happily and sustainably on this planet.

In July 2011, I fulfilled a lifelong dream and spent a week in the Amazon rainforest, at an eco-lodge about 100 km south of Manaus in Amazonas state. It was truly amazing, though it is difficult for me to be in a place of such ecological richness without also being conscious of how our species is rapidly destroying such places throughout our planet.

 

From August through October of 2011, I was a visiting scholar at the Spanish AI Research Institute in Barcelona Spain, hosted by the Spanish Government. Barcelona is a lovely cosmopolitan city, an amazing place to visit. And it gave me a chance to pursue my ambition of seriously working on my Spanish.

I spent Feb and March of 2013 as a visiting researcher in the Information Science Department at the University of Otago, New Zealand, hosted by Michael Winikoff. New Zealand is a truly wondrous place in terms of its natural beauty.

I spent May 2013 as a visiting researcher in the Nagoya Institute of Technology in Nagoya, Japan, hosted by Takayuki Ito, a long-time collaborator of mine.

As of September 2013, I’ve taken a leave of absence from MIT to participate in the two year CATALYST European Union project aimed at creating better ways to harvest the wisdom of the crowds for socially impactful applications. My host is Prof. Avi Bernstein at the University of Zurich, and I’ll be working with an international team that includes Imagination for People as well as Prof. Simon Buckingham Shum at the Open University. I’m looking forward to meeting new people, seeing new places, and doing interesting and potentially impactful work. My hope is that I will be able to secure new US funding, and return to MIT, after the EU project concludes.

In September 2014, I spent a very interesting and productive month as a visitor at ADDLabs, which is a part of Fluminense Federal University (UFF) in Rio de Janeiro Brazil. I gave six lectures for a UFF class on Collective Intelligence, and collaborated intensively on some research projects with ADDLabs director Prof. Ana Cristina Bicharra Garcia, who was my host for the visit. Brazil is a place of contrasts: great natural beauty and a warm vibrant culture, as well as all the heartbreaking problems associated with developing, resource-extraction-based, economies.

I did a lot of traveling in Fall 2015, including a 1 month stay as a visiting international professor at the Nagoya Institute of Technology (where I taught a course on collective intelligence), plus a month as visiting research fellow at the University of Alcala in Alcala Spain, working on protocols for enabling complex negotiation.

I spent August of 2016 as a visiting research fellow at the Social Media Lab at Ryerson University in Toronto, working on deliberation-centric social media analysis. It was a nice trip: my hosts were great, Toronto is a vibrant cosmopolitain city, and I got to train almost every day at the renowned Systema schools there.

What I Do When I’m Not At Work

The two most important people in my life are my wife Jan and my daughter Hannah. I like talking with Jan about life, and telling Hannah stories about exotic places and times.

I enjoy outdoor adventures, in particular hiking, SCUBA diving, and rock/mountain climbing. Some of my most memorable climbs include Joshua Tree in California, Devil’s Tower in Wyoming, Mount Rainier in Washington State, and Mount Fuji in Japan.

I like to travel and live abroad, the more exotic the better. Most of my trips have been to the Pacific Rim, including Australia, Hong Kong, Mauritius, Vietnam, Thailand, Korea, Singapore and Japan (where I lived for a year), but I’ve also visited parts of Europe, Central America, Israel and Brazil. My most memorable trips include the San Blas islands off the coast of Panama, Heron Island in Australia’s Great Barrier Reef, Ho Chi Minh city (Saigon) in Vietnam, New Zealand, and the Amazon rain forest. I speak French and Japanese and Spanish (some rusty). My current ambitions include learning Mandarin Chinese, visiting India, Tibet, and Africa as well as remote parts of Indonesia.

I have studied the martial arts intensively since 1982. I have a black belt in Karate as well as in Bong Suul (a Korean weapons style), and have an instructor’s rating in Tai Chi Chuan through Yang’s Martial Arts Association. In the last two years, I have become entranced with Systema, a remarkable Russian martial art that uses soft style principles in a deep and very pragmatic way. I have been impressed by the insights that this training has offered concerning fundamental principles of mental and physical effectiveness.

I have been exploring the practice of some spiritual disciplines, particularly the Buddhist path, which I see as a comprehensive and pragmatic cirriculum that seems very compatible with my personal experiences as well as my understanding of the emerging sciences of consciousness.

I hope to re-kindle my previous involvement in classical guitar and shodo (Japanese calligraphy), as well as increase my involvement in service activities, particularly concerning children and the environment.

My Mission Statement

Sharpen Sword Continuously develop and integrate my physical, mental and spiritual resources. Keep myself healthy and capable so I feel physically good and I am not hampered from doing anything I want to do. Develop my ability to fully experience, love and accept every part of myself, other people, and the universe, just as it is.

 

Family Man Foster a loving family, helping each other grow towards our full potential. Provide for the basic needs of my family, a few luxuries, plus enough financial security so we can weather out storms, make changes and take chances. Support and be close to my father and sister as well as Jan’s family. Have time/energy for fun meaningful shared family activities. Expose Jan and Hannah to the best the world has to offer in culture & nature.

 

Social Being Develop intimate meaningful connections with a wide range of interesting estimable people. Develop and participate fully in a vital community.

 

World Citizen Contribute to greater harmony, justice and growth in human society. Leave the natural environment as a whole better off than when I entered it, and work towards achieving a sustainable and vital natural environment.

 

Research Scientist Make a contribution to research, as a mentor, and as an educator/consultant, aligning my work with my social/environmental values. Do fun, creative, collaborative work. Create opportunities to meet interesting people, travel etc. Always keep an appropriate balance between work and non-work.

 

Gourmand of Life Experience first-hand that which is wonderful, including love and friendship, human cultures and natural wonders. Experience adventures of every type, including discovery about myself, others and the universe at large.